The Sophia Antipolis based start-up VenomeTech will use the Pasteur Institute’s historical collection of venoms.

- Projects news

The Sophia Antipolis based start-up VenomeTech has just come to an agreement with the Pasteur Institute for the transfer of the Institute’s historical collection of venoms to the company. The company will use these venoms in the discovery of innovative therapeutic molecules, VenomeTech's core activity.

The Sophia Antipolis based start-up VenomeTech has just come to an agreement with the Pasteur Institute for the transfer of the Institute’s historical collection of venoms to the company. The company will use these venoms in the discovery of innovative therapeutic molecules, VenomeTech's core activity. These unique samples hold major discovery potential and complement VenomeTech’s already extensive collection of venoms. They are a unique resource for the discovery of new medicines. VenomeTech is thus pursuing its development in establishing itself as a world leader in the field of exploration of animal venoms for the development of therapeutic solutions.

Developing medicine libraries from venoms
VenomeTech, a spin-off from Nice University Sophia Antipolis, develops innovative medicines derived from the proteins contained within venoms from spiders, snakes, scorpions, sea anemones venoms and other venomous animals. It is estimated that in total, these venoms could contain forty million bioactive molecules, many of which target cellular receptors involved in major pathologies such as pain, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases or cancer. Some have already provided the basis for developing pain, hypertension and diabetes medication. Exploring the potential of the Pasteur Institute’s historical collection of snake venoms requires the specific expertise and investigation resources that VenomeTech can provide.

The Pasteur Institute: a rich history in the study of venomsThe Pasteur Institute has a long history of research into venoms, their effects and, above all, efforts to combat poisoning, which began with Albert Calmette (in Saigon, 1891-1894 then at the Pasteur Institute, 1894-1895) and the first successful applications of serotherapy. Under the direction of Cassian Bon from 1972 until its closure in 2004, the laboratory of venoms and toxins was at the origin of numerous significant scientific advances in the understanding of the modes of action of snake venoms and toxins. The epidemiological studies on viper bites in France, the pharmaco- and toxicokinetics of viper venoms and the clotting disorders caused by Viperidae venoms are still authoritative.

The collections of venoms brought together over time by this laboratory are therefore of unique value, both historical and scientific.